Swell Festival 2016 – part 2

On my last post I shared some of the sculptures featured in the Swell 2016 Sculpture Festival. As promised, here is a part two of my selection of images.

Swell Festival 2016 – part 1

Up before the sun and with a hit of caffeine, Hubby, Bundy and I were ready to head south to Currumbin, host to the 2016 Swell Sculpture Festival. Sunrise and sunset are the best times to experience the festival, fewer crowds and better light for taking photos. Bundy loves the festival, it is his chance to run around on the sand and meet a few new faces (or sniff new butts to put it in dog terms). Alphy the turtle is the big hit this year, as are the huge deck chairs but I really love the dog walker sculpture and the timber freight boxes lying on the sand. With so many sculptures I have decided to break up the photos and share them in two lots, you will see more of the dog walker and other wonderful works of art sometime next week.

Which one is your favourite?

Azzedine Alaïa and the Borghese

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The Borghese Gallery, Rome

Poor planning on our last trip to Rome resulted in me being unable to get a ticket to see the Borghese Gallery, I was devastated and vowed that it wouldn’t happen again. After failing to successfully purchase tickets through the Borghese Gallery I decided to pay that little bit extra and get skip the line tickets through Viator. Our entry time was at 9am and we had until 11am to view the entire gallery, at 11am they kicked us all out and the next group of visitors went through. Two hours doesn’t seem like much, we could have easily spent another hour at least in the gallery especially with the addition of garments from the Azzedine Alaïa collection being on display.

The ‘no photo’ rule seemed to have been withdrawn from the Borghese, I vaguely recall reading in guidebooks and hearing on travel podcasts that photos were strictly prohibited and cameras would have to be stored in lockers. All around us people were taking photos with iphones, DSLRs and compact cameras and nobody seemed to care. After a few quick shots with my iphone, out came my trusty Nikon DSLR and it didn’t return to its bag until we were in the gallery gift shop.

The Azzedine Alaïa gowns on display were stunning, much thought had gone into the location of each gown or group of garments with some looking almost like a ghostly apparition among the sculptures and paintings. In the nineties I loved seeing Azzedine Alaïa’s designs on supermodels such as Naomi Campbell and Stephanie Seymour, they wore them so well and the gowns looked like works of art. Moving around the gallery, my eyes flicked from classical sculptures to fashion items and while others crowded around Bernini’s Apollo and Daphne I was taking photos of the nearest design by Azzedine Alaïa. This gave me one advantage, by the time I had finished admiring the design most of the group had moved on and I could enjoy the sculptures in relative quiet.

The Borghese Gallery is a most magnificent place to visit, I walked out of there feeling extremely happy and it would have to rate as one of my most enjoyable gallery and/or museum experiences. The restricted number of visitors at any one time certainly enhances the experience, having been to the Vatican Museum where numbers do not appear to be limited and large tour groups crowd the halls and stairwells, I much prefer having to book in advance for a nominated time slot.

A sample from Swell 2014

The annual Swell Sculpture Festival is currently underway at Currumbin Beach Queensland. Traffic was bumper to bumper and parks were scarce but after 20 minutes of stalking potential parking spots we were successful and joined the hordes on the esplanade at Currumbin Beach. Bundy always enjoys an evening stroll, he and the hubby spent most of their time people watching and patiently waiting for me to finish taking photographs. Here is a sample of some of my favourites from this years festival.

Enjoy!

Sculptures by the Sea with my iPhone

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I never thought that the opportunity to see Sculptures by the Sea would arise this year, there was just too much going on that required my attention (and my budget). As it turns out, a trip to Sydney popped up and U was able to take my Dad on a tour of Tamarama and Bondi to view some in incredible art. Lacking my DSLR meant relying on my iPhone and lack of a laptop has me two finger typing this post on the iPhone WordPress app, so please excuse any typos 🙂

The day was spectacular, school kids and tourists were out in full force and everyone had some sort of camera, my photos will not be unique but I don’t care, I had a great time.

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The last of Swell 2013 (part 3)

The last of my images from the Swell Sculpture Festival 🙂

More culture at Swell 2013 (part 2)

Walking along such a popular and pretty part of the coast at sunset is a pleasant experience any time of year, during Swell it is made more interesting by the addition of sculptures scattered across the sand and along the esplanade. There are children, dogs and happy snappers everywhere, and even though the signs all say ‘Please don’t climb on the sculptures’, many of them are begging for interaction and it is possible to walk around and through some of the installations. Looking back, I have to wonder whether a theme for the festival could be one of interaction, encouraging children and adults to participate in the piece, firing up their imagination and expressing their creativity.

This gallery is the second of three galleries that I’ll be posting and featuring work from the Swell Sculpture Festival, I hope you enjoy the photographs as much as I enjoyed the exhibition.

A bit of culture at the Swell 2013 Sculpture Festival (part 1)

The Swell Sculpture Festival at Currumbin is an annual event, this year it was held September 13-22 and featured 50 artworks that ranged from inspiring to quirky, in an array of sizes from small enough to sit on a lamp table to artwork so large that children would need more than a couple of sheets to turn them into cubby houses. The festival has become a bit of a pilgrimage for me, introduced to the event by an artistic friend about 8 years ago, I have been back almost every year with camera in hand and I even managed to introduce a few of my friends to the event.

Last year, the hubby and I took our smallest black dog to Currumbin and watched the sunrise over the festival, it was an awesome experience and I managed to get some pretty good photos in the soft morning light. This year we decided to venture down in the afternoon and see the exhibition as the sun set, the place was packed with others like us, cameras and iPhones in hand, generating thousands of images in one evening so I can only imagine how many photos of the sculptures are now on Facebook, Twitter and Flickr. As usual, I took a few hundred photos and sorting through them has been a bit of a process because some of the sculptures really captured my attention resulting in photographs from several different viewpoints, as well as photographing them in the changing light.

I hope you enjoy part 1 of my series of photographs from the Swell 2013 Sculpture Festival, stay tuned for more throughout the week.

More than just a cardboard box

First year Bachelor of Digital Media students at Griffith University have created sculptures out of cardboard as part of their Visual Strategies course. The cardboard sculptures are scattered across the campus and reflect thoughts of consumerism, big business monopolies and our environment, each year this outdoor exhibition provides staff and students at the university with something new and fascinating to see.

I wish I could tell you more about each artwork and the brief that inspired each creation but I didn’t think that far ahead. Even without all the details, the thought and skill that goes into creating each artwork has to be admired, who would have thought that brown, corrugated cardboard could be so interesting.