Using Lightroom for processing my photos

Photoshop came into my life in the early nineties, at the time I was in my last year of a degree in graphic design and had just bought an Apple LCIII with an 80MB hard drive. Since graduating there has been numerous upgrades to the software and my computers and I moved from using Photoshop for processing photographs to Lightroom. Lightroom doesn’t have the millions of features that Photoshop has but it is sufficient for most things I want to do and the interface is easier to use, and it has the added bonus of being alot cheaper.

There are heaps of tips and video tutorials available for users of Lightroom, and a few days ago I came across a short YouTube clip demonstrating how to add a bit of oomph to my images. The technique is quite simple, boost saturation of the Blue Primary in your Camera Calibration menu.  Below is the video tutorial by Trevor Dayley:

Although it may not be suitable for all images, you can choose the level of saturation and it does work quite well with my landscape photographs. Below are a couple of before and after pictures so you can see the difference. I’d love to know what you think, does it work for you? Which image do you prefer?

Having coffee in Riomaggiore, Italy
The Hubby ‘before’ pic with only minor adjustments made and no adjusting of the blue primary.
The before pic with only minor adjustments made and 100% saturation with blue primary.
The Hubby ‘after’ pic with only minor adjustments made and 100% saturation with blue primary.
Vernazza at dusk
The Vernazza ‘before’ pic with only minor adjustments made and no adjusting of the blue primary.
The Vernazza 'after' pic with only minor adjustments made and 100% saturation of the blue primary.
The Vernazza ‘after’ pic with only minor adjustments made and 100% saturation of the blue primary.
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Food glorious food…part two

Whilst travelling around Europe last year I took thousands of photos, some of these focused on the delightful array of food available from markets and the meals we consumed. Many of the photos are merely happy snaps, badly lit and slightly blurred photographs of the food we ate and often I was so absorbed in the eating of a tasty dish that I completely forgot to take a photo. Anyway, the first part of our journey and the food we ate is covered in Food glorious food…part one and I had meant to continue the story but never got around to it…until now.

The food in Italy can be bad, good or fantastic, we were lucky in that we chose good to fantastic food for the majority of the time and the two bad meals we ate were due to laziness and convenience, not bad for four weeks of eating in Italy. Italians don’t really do breakfast, at least not the way we do so we settled for the in-house breakfasts most of the time, although not great, we enjoyed trying Cruesli (Muesli with choc chips) and the array of home baked cakes and tarts at the B&B Villa degli Ulivi were scrumptious. Occasionally cold cuts of meat and boiled eggs were also available in addition to the pastries, jam and bread rolls, the coffee was usually very ordinary so we took to visiting the local bars for an espresso.

Wherever possible we tried local wines and local specialties, guided by the waiters in the restaurants and in Rome we asked the ‘host’ of the Cantina Cantarini to help us choose our meals, selecting fresh, seasonal produce and simple flavours so good that we returned the following night. In Florence we ate picnics outside the Boboli Gardens, pasta in the San Lorenzo Markets and spent an evening with our travellers at a inTavola cooking class, the class was so much fun and at the end of the evening we sat down to enjoy the fruits of our labour accompanied by a couple of glasses of wine.

Wherever we went I managed to track down a gelateria (even in Germany), I was on a mission to try as many flavours as possible and am proud to say that I tried 25 different flavours, some of them twice (pistachio, zabaglione and pannacotta) and some of which I don’t remember. I have to admit that there are just some flavours that I’ve never been really fond of such as melon or licorice so I stayed clear of them and there are possibly hundreds more flavours I could have tried however there was still a budget to stick to and having gelato for every meal was not the objective. Some of the more unusual (for me) flavours were: Coconut, Riesling, Fior di Latte (Milk), Torrone and Cherries and cream.

Here is just a taste of what we enjoyed in Italy, starting with local specialties in Vernazza to wild boar in Umbria, panettone in Siena and seafood in Sorrento, it really was a food tour of Italy and the extra kilos in weight that I gained were well and truly worth it 🙂

Buon appetito!

Pesto al trofie, Vernazza
Pesto al trofie, Vernazza
Fried seafood, Vernazza
Fried seafood, Vernazza
Sicilian Cannoli, Il Pirata Vernazza
Sicilian Cannoli, Il Pirata Vernazza
Learning to cook in Florence
Learning to cook in Florence
The first course ready to go in the oven
The first course ready to go in the oven, layers of eggplant, mashed potato with zucchini and pancetta, and fontina cheese.
The first course, made by us in Florence
The first course, made by us in Florence
Steak, Florence
Steak, Florence
Fried Zucchini, Florence
Fried Zucchini, Florence
Sweets on display, Florence
Sweets on display, Florence
Wild boar ragu and pappardelle pasta, Siena
Wild boar ragu and pappardelle pasta, Siena
Spaghetti with clams, Siena
Spaghetti with clams, Siena
Roast pork sandwich and Panetone picnic, Siena
Roast pork sandwich and Panettone picnic, Siena
Fresh fruit for sale, Siena
Fresh fruit for sale, Siena
Tortelloni, Siena
Tortelloni, Siena
Coffee to end the meal, Siena
Coffee to end the meal, Siena
Sausage pizza in Volterra
Sausage pizza in Volterra
Salami and pecorino sandwiches in Pienza
Salami and pecorino sandwiches in Pienza
A glass of wine to celebrate the day, Orvieto
A glass of wine to celebrate the day, Orvieto
Breakfast in Orvieto
Breakfast in Orvieto
A little food with our wine, Orvieto
A little food with our wine, Orvieto
Wild boar stew, Orvieto
Wild boar stew, Orvieto
Roast pork medallions, Orvieto
Roast pork medallions, Orvieto
Cooking over an open flame, Civita di Bagnoreggio
Cooking over an open flame, Civita di Bagnoreggio
Grilled vegetables at a cantina, Civita di Bagnoreggio
Grilled vegetables at a cantina, Civita di Bagnoreggio
Pastries for sale, Assisi
Pastries for sale, Assisi
Pasta and assorted food products for sale in Sorrento
Pasta and assorted food products for sale in Sorrento
Mixed seafood and pasta, Sorrento
Mixed seafood and pasta, Sorrento
Prawns and pasta, Sorrento
Prawns and pasta, Sorrento
Fresh lemons, Sorrento
Fresh lemons, Sorrento
Eating gelato in Rome
Eating gelato in Rome
Mmmmm...gelato, Rome
Mmmmm…gelato, Rome

Updates on Vernazza and Monterosso

Lovers seat, Via dell Amore Cinque Terre
Lovers seat, Via dell Amore Cinque Terre

As I slowly work my way towards finishing my first photobook of our 2011 holiday in Europe and the rain continues to pour down I am reminded that it has been a while since I provided updated information on the progress of cleaning up Vernazza and Cinque Terre after flooding and mudslides in October last year.

The best sites for getting up to date information and photographs are two of my favourite travel blogs (I have quite a few favourites): Cultural Comments and Once in a Lifetime Travel, the other important website to check out is Save Vernazza, through this site you can make donations to help with the rebuilding. I don’t need to repeat everything they have written, but it is important to acknowledge the hard work that all the residents, volunteers and emergency services are doing in order to clean up and restore the town to its former beauty. Monterosso, another of the 5 villages of the Cinque Terre was also devastated by the flooding and badly needs your support, local residents have worked tirelessly to restore Monterosso, go to the Rebuild Monterosso site for more information on their progress and on how you can help.

My husband and I are planning another trip to Europe for 2014 and will definitely be heading back to Cinque Terre, I know it is a long way off but the income from tourism will be essential for the rebuilding of Vernazza and Monterosso.

A mixed bag – 2011 in review

After starting reasonably well (the first few days anyway), the year 2011 presented us with a mixed bag of good and bad leaving many of us thinking WTF! It was the year that my husband and I had been looking forward to for several years with a dream trip to Europe booked, 8 weeks of travelling from Paris to Amsterdam, a week in Germany, a few days in Switzerland and four weeks in Italy.

Notre Dame Cathedral at night
Notre Dame Cathedral at night

Before we had even booked our accommodation disaster after disaster hit and although it didn’t affect us directly, emotions were high and I couldn’t help feeling a little guilty about taking an overseas holiday when many were without homes and had lost loved ones. First came the Queensland and Brisbane floods, 75% of the state was under water including one of Australia’s capital cities, over 30 people had died in Queensland as a result of flooding since the end of November. Christchurch, New Zealand was then hit with a devastating 6.3 earthquake that tore apart the city and killed almost 200 people, since then they have experienced over 5000 quakes. That earthquake was quickly followed by another in Japan, triggering a massive tsunami and a nuclear crisis which will continue to have a devastating impact on our environment for many years to come.

Christchurch Cathedral
Christchurch Cathedral long before the earthquake

The devastation didn’t stop there with mudslides in Brazil killing almost 500, cyclone Yasi in North Queensland, earthquakes in Turkey and Pakistan, flooding in the Phillipines and a prolonged drought in Africa resulting in the UN declaring a famine which is believed to be affecting over 10 million people. I’m sure that there are many events that I am missing, but I cannot recall them all and there is probably a website or two where you can get more detailed information and timelines.

During our holiday we stayed in the small picturesque town of Vernazza in Cinque Terre, a beautiful and romantic spot visited by tourists all year round. Sadly, in October the region was hit by flooding and Vernazza was hit by a massive mudslide, one of two towns in Cinque Terre drastically affected by flooding, the other being Monterosso. This disaster didn’t make the headlines in Australia, it was only through a post from Rick Steve on his blog that I found out about it and then tracked down more regular information in a fabulous blog called Cultural Comments. Although fewer lives were lost in the floods in the region of Liguria than in other natural disasters, this one was close to our hearts because of the joy we felt when visiting Cinque Terre and one day soon we hope to return.

Vernazza's scenic harbour
Vernazza's scenic harbour

Not only were there natural disasters, but the health of colleagues, friends and their families also suffered with a heart attack taking the life of our dear friend Mike and cancer in several forms causing heartache and pain for too many to mention. When the health of those around you suffers it really does make you think about your own health so in 2012 I’ll be heading off to the doctors for a full check up, I also plan on eating more healthy food and ramping up the exercise which will be good for me and my furry friends.

Our most faithful, loyal and bestest friends really copped alot of flak this year thanks to the implementation of Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) which is the banning of breeds such as Pit Bulls (or pit bull type) because they are dangerous. Following the progress of the Save Lennox campaign has demonstrated to me how badly BSL works, over 121,000 people have signed the petition to let Lennox go home to his family and there have been numerous appeals but we’re still waiting for the judge to make a (just and fair) decision. I think BSL is a reactive piece of legislation and don’t believe that it will reduce the number of dog bites, nor will it reduce dog fighting, it will just drive them deeper underground. I don’t know how anybody is actually going to stop stupid and cruel people from owning and training dogs (of any breed) to be vicious, euthanising humans is against the law. Animal cruelty in general appears to be on the increase, it is a sad reflection of our society and it is time for governments to introduce tougher penalties for people guilty of inflicting pain and suffering on animals.

Two black dogs
Two Black Dogs

Despite all the sadness and feeling as though 2011 was the worst year ever I have to remind myself that it wasn’t all bad. Apart from our wonderful holiday in Europe we also celebrated a 21st, a couple of 40th birthdays, spent time with family and friends from interstate and I managed to get a high distinction for my Marketing course. 2011 was also the year that I finally registered as a volunteer for the Animal Welfare League in Queensland, my Sunday mornings are now spent blissfully walking and cuddling dogs that are living in a shelter and waiting for someone to give them a forever home, it is the best job I have ever had. Blogging has been a positive experience for me, it has led me to other blogs, people with similar interests and fascinating stories to tell, not to mention beautiful photographs and artwork. I have high hopes for 2012 🙂

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog and whilst the stats aren’t huge I am still impressed and very appreciative of the fact that people other than my family and friends actually read my blog. I didn’t think that anyone would really be interested in the report so I’ve only left the excerpt below, thank you for liking/reading/following Two Black Dogs, have a fabulous 2012.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 3,800 times in 2011. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 3 trips to carry that many people.

The Cinque Terre Trail minus Monterosso

Two glorious Spring days in Cinque Terre, but we only spent a couple of hours in Monterosso and that was mainly at the station as we waited for the next train to Vernazza. The station was noisy, bells ringing so loud that we couldn’t hear the announcements and the large crowds waiting for trains didn’t help. Eventually our train arrived and we squeezed ourselves and our luggage into the carriage, standing room only was not a problem for us, it wasn’t long before we were getting off the train at Vernazza.

We spend our first afternoon wandering around Vernazza, taking a break to sit every now and then to watch the boats come in or just to enjoy the view. The next day will be a big day for us, we plan to buy a Cinque Terre card tomorrow and explore some of the other villages that make up the Cinque Terre: Riomaggiore, Manarola and Corniglia. The Cinque Terre Card is not expensive (10 euros), it is one ticket that includes train travel and entry to the Cinque Terre trail which is National Park.

Chapel of Santa Marta, Vernazza
Chapel of Santa Marta, Vernazza

We started our day by catching a train to Riomaggiore, along with many others, the platform was packed with people and all of them seemed to have the same idea as us. The weather was perfect, blue skies and balmy temperatures, great for enjoying a day outdoors. In our bags were bottles of water, fresh bread, pesto, cheese and salami, a picnic lunch the choice of budget travellers everywhere and with such delicious ingredients available why would you choose anything else.

Blue skies and blue water of Riomaggiore
Blue skies and blue water of Riomaggiore

Riomaggiore sits on a cliff beside the sea, the houses look like they could tumble into the water at any moment, the water is deep blue green and Marty is itching to go for a swim. Access to town is via a tunnel from the station, the views of houses, gardens and playgrounds are delightful and I take many photos. While Marty takes the chance to sit and watch passersby, I head down into the town via narrow streets and tiny stairs until I find a spot to take photos of the marina and a couple of playful seagulls. It would be nice to spend the whole day exploring the town, but the Via dell’Amore calls and we make our way back towards the station.

Colourful houses of Riomaggiore
Colourful houses of Riomaggiore
From Riomaggiore to the sea
From Riomaggiore to the sea
Riomaggiore's marina
Riomaggiore's marina
Via dell'Amore, connecting Riomaggiore with Manarola
Via dell'Amore, connecting Riomaggiore with Manarola

We run into two Queenslanders, Kristy and Elias as we start the Via dell’Amore walk, we had met them on the train from Milan to Monterosso and being such a friendly couple we joined them for the walk. Via dell’Amore is the shortest and easiest walk on the entire trail, it is also the only time we walk between two villages of the Cinque Terre, opting to use the trains for the rest of the day. Along the way we stop to listen to a busker and take in the spectacular views of the coast line, messages of love are carved into the different surfaces and padlocks are attached to fences.

Lovers seat, Via dell'Amore
Lovers seat, Via dell'Amore
Manarola Station
Great view from Manarola Station
Padlock of love, Manarola
Padlock of love, Manarola

We say goodbye to Kristy and Elias, they are planning to walk to Corniglia however we want to see more of Manarola and find a shady spot to eat our lunch. The streets are filled with people and we follow the scent of fried fish down to the water front, the water is a deep blue green and looks extremely inviting. Marty finds his way down to where the boats come in, the breeze is refreshing after walking in the sun. One of the more amusing sights we see is a woman carrying a rather large labrador pup, he must have tired of walking and given his owner the look that no dog owner can resist. We find a shady spot under the balcony of a restaurant, it is closed and yet there are tables and chairs for people to sit on, a lucky find.

Streets of Manarola
Streets of Manarola
Manarola's Harbour
Manarola's Harbour
Shopfront in Manarola
Shopfront in Manarola

The train to Corniglia is packed, lots of smelly sweaty bodies crammed into each carriage, we meet a Kiwi couple who tell us that the path between Manarola and Corniglia is closed hence the heavy use of the train. There are a couple of options for getting from Corniglia station to the town, walk up the 365 stairs or catch a connecting bus, we choose the less energetic option. Corniglia is the only town not on the edge of the sea, it is up in the hills and surrounded by vineyards. It is a small town, with narrow winding streets and a lookout that provides you with a view of the vineyards on one side and Manarola and the sea on the other side. The gelati here is sublime, it is difficult for me to choose a flavour, Marty always goes for the hazelnut or coffee flavours. To get back to the station we take the stairs, it is a pleasant walk, cloud cover has taken the heat out of the day and the stairs are shaded in various places.

Corniglia street
Corniglia street
Vineyards on the hills around Corniglia
Vineyards on the hills around Corniglia
The many steps leading to Corniglia
The many steps leading to Corniglia

Once back in Vernazza Marty decides to walk around town and maybe go for a swim, I take a walk along the trail behind Vernazza, as though I was heading towards Monterosso. The sun has not yet set and many people are walking along the trail, heading towards a point on the track where you can stop and look back towards Vernazza and it’s beautiful harbour. The track runs alongside vineyards and vegetable gardens, bright red poppies contrast with the lush green of the grassy hills, some parts of the track are paved both most of it is gravel and rock. The view of Vernazza really is special, the setting sun provides a warmth and a glow that soaks the village in wonderful colour. I stand there wishing we never had to leave. Back in town Marty has been shopping, he has bought Mortadella, cheese, pesto and panini for our train trip to Florence the next day, however he is still yet to go for a swim, perhaps he will when we reach Sorrento.

Vernazza's harbour as the sun sets
Vernazza's harbour as the sun sets
Strolling down Via Roma, Vernazza
Strolling down Via Roma, Vernazza

Natural disasters in the news…or not

Flooding on the Gold Coast, January 2011
Flooding on the Gold Coast, January 2011

Late 2010, early 2011 Queensland was affected by devastating floods in 75% of the state, a number of people lost their lives and many others lost their homes and livelihoods. We had updates on the television and in the papers 24 x7, thousands of volunteers showed up to help clean up the city of Brisbane and millions of dollars was raised to help everyone affected.

Since then we’ve had earthquakes in Christchurch, a tsunami and earthquakes in Japan, mudslides in Brazil, earthquakes in Turkey, flooding in Thailand (which is only now starting to recede) and more recently flooding in Italy that has ravaged the towns of Monterosso and Vernazza as well as the city of Genova. The combined media coverage on all of those events has come nowhere near the amount of coverage we saw with the floods in Queensland, I know that people what to know what is happening in their own region but I am disappointed that the level of coverage for recent events has been lacking. Thank heavens for the internet is all I can say.

If you want good information including photographs and regular updates on what is happening in Vernazza and other parts of Liguria, Italy please check out Nicole’s blog Cultural Comments as well as the SaveVernazza site which also has information on how to make donations.

If you more interested in what has been happening in Thailand, a little closer to home for me but a destination I have never had the privilege of visiting, you can get information from various news sites but I like the Huffington Post and the Soi Dog Foundation. The Soi Dog Foundation is an organisation working hard to save dogs and cats affected by the flooding in Bangkok, a worthy cause for an animal lover like me.

Vernazza devastated by torrential rain and mudslide

Vernazza at night
Vernazza at night

When I wrote my last post about the beauty of Tuscany complete with images that I took while exploring the region, little did I know that one of our favourite little towns, Vernazza, had been devastated by torrential rain and a mudslide. When my husband and I saw the news about flooding in Liguria we did not realise that the area we had fallen in love with earlier this year had been so dramatically and tragically affected. I found out about the disaster through a Rick Steve’s newsletter, but more information is provided on the Cultural Comments blog and after reading it I felt as though I needed to put something in writing about our time in Vernazza.

View from the Cinque Terre walking trail
View of Vernazza's harbour from the Cinque Terre walking trail

Vernazza is one of five towns on the Cinque Terre, I wrote about it briefly along with Venice and Varenna in an earlier blog. A small, picturesque town on the coast of Italy, there are no large hotels and traffic is restricted to locals, the surrounding hills are covered in grape vines and the bay is home to numerous, colourful fishing boats. Warm and tasty foccacia fresh from the oven could be bought as a snack, we dined on fresh seafood, pesto al trofie and creamy gelato. It was a truly wonderful time and we left reluctantly, vowing to return as soon as we could afford to.

Via Roma, Vernazza
Via Roma, Vernazza

We stayed in one of Tonino Basso’s rooms, lovely rooms overlooking the street and next to Il Pirata, a great place to enjoy breakfast and a laugh with the hosts Lucca and Massimo. In this video on the Cinque Terre blog you can see the cars being swept away by the flood, below is a photo of the same street, taken during our stay.

View from our accommodation, Vernazza
View from our accommodation, Vernazza

Vernazza, like many locations affected by the extremes of mother nature will need time and support to get back on its feet. The work to make this happen began soon after the event and with a bit of luck, no to mention alot of hard work and funding, the town will again be open to visitors in the not-too-distant future. I will be following the blog Cultural Comments to see how the future pans out for Vernazza, but in the meantime will share a few photos taken during our stay and keep my fingers crossed that the town and its people are returned to their former glory.

Vernazza in the evening
Vernazza in the evening
Yum...Gelati
Yum...Gelati
Bar Trattoria Il Baretto
Il Baretto - home of delicious pesto al trofie and seafood
View of the harbour and adjacent cafe
View of the harbour and adjacent cafe

It was here, on the border of the harbour, that we met two American travellers, a husband and wife enjoying a romantic, short break away from their children. A lovely, chatty couple, possibly more so because of the bottle of Limoncello they were drinking, the conversation was pleasant and did much to dispell the myth of the ‘ugly american’ traveler, we certainly enjoyed the opportunity to speak English with someone other than ourselves.

Vernazza's castle tower by the water
Vernazza's castle tower by the water

The water looked cool and inviting, around the edges of the harbour people were sunbathing and children were wading, my husband debated the merits of going for a swim but I was quite comfortable to sit in the sun and soak up the ambience of such a pretty place. Ferries came and went, dropping off tourists and picking more up, the options for getting between town are train, boat or walking along the Cinque Terre trail however the boats apparently only operate during the warmer months.

Vernazza's scenic harbour
Vernazza's scenic harbour